Advanced materials
for a cleaner future

Our Mission

Mosaic Materials is dedicated to reducing the cost and environmental impact of fossil fuels through the application of proprietary, highly efficient gas separation technologies. We utilize porous solids known as metal-organic frameworks to selectively remove impurities such as CO2 from gas mixtures in an array of applications from submarines to power plants.

Our Technology

Metal-organic frameworks

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a class of porous solids suitable for gas separations owing to their large internal surface areas and chemical tunability. We have developed an adsorbent material that selectively captures CO2 with higher efficiency and lower costs.


Cooperative Binding

Unique performance characteristics are achieved through a proprietary “cooperative binding” process first developed by the cofounders of Mosaic Materials at UC Berkeley. This one-of-a-kind mechanism allows our materials to reversibly adsorb large quantities of CO2 more efficiently than other adsorbents.


Efficient Regeneration

The cooperative-binding technology allows the CO2-loaded materials to be regenerated using only moderate temperature or pressure changes, substantially increasing energy efficiency and decreasing costs.

Diverse applications

Our materials have the potential to substantially improve breathing air quality within confined spaces such as submarines and space missions, to substantially reduce the energy required to sweeten natural gas, and to drastically reduce the cost of capturing CO2 from power plants and other industrial sources.


Our Technology

Metal-organic frameworks

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a class of porous solids suitable for gas separations owing to their large internal surface areas and chemical tunability. We have developed an adsorbent material that selectively captures CO2 with higher efficiency and lower costs.


Cooperative Binding

Unique performance characteristics are achieved through a proprietary “cooperative binding” process first developed by the cofounders of Mosaic Materials at UC Berkeley. This one-of-a-kind mechanism allows our materials to reversibly adsorb large quantities of CO2 more efficiently than other adsorbents.


Efficient Regeneration

The cooperative-binding technology allows the CO2-loaded materials to be regenerated using only moderate temperature or pressure changes, substantially increasing energy efficiency and decreasing costs.


Diverse applications

Our materials have the potential to substantially improve breathing air quality within confined spaces such as submarines and space missions, to substantially reduce the energy required to sweeten natural gas, and to drastically reduce the cost of capturing CO2 from power plants and other industrial sources.


Our Team

Dr. Thomas McDonald, CEO & Co-founder

Thomas M. McDonald is the Chief Executive Officer and a co-founder of Mosaic Materials, a Berkeley, California based materials startup. He received a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley under the guidance of Prof. Jeffrey R. Long and his B.A. in chemistry from Northwestern University. Dr. McDonald is an expert in the design, synthesis, and use of amine-functionalized solid adsorbents and metal-organic frameworks for gas separations.


Dr. Zoey Herm, Materials scientist

Zoey R. Herm joined Mosaic Materials in 2016 and is currently a materials scientist. Dr. Herm joined the Mosaic team through the Cyclotron Road program at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Dr. Herm’s diverse work on gas separations in metal-organic frameworks has produced twelve academic papers and one patent. She completed her Ph.D. in chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley, under the guidance of Prof. Jeffrey R. Long and has a B.A. in chemistry from Macalester College.


Dr. Carly E. Anderson, Engineer

Carly E. Anderson joined the Mosaic team in 2017 as an engineer. She completed her Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley on applications of electrical plasmas at ambient conditions and engineering advanced materials for energy applications. Previously, Dr. Anderson spent three years as an engineering consultant for the nuclear industry, specializing in water chemistry, corrosion mitigation and thermal performance. She holds a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Cornell University.


Malika Nayar, Commercialization consultant

Malika Nayar joined Mosaic Materials in 2017, and is graduating this year with an MBA from the London Business School. Previously she worked for an energy major for seven years as a chemical engineer on two Australian LNG megaprojects, working primarily on gas processing design of these large scale gas plants. She holds a B.S in Chemical Engineering from Curtin University in Perth, Australia.


Professor Jeffrey Long, Co-founder

Jeffrey R. Long is a Professor of Chemistry and Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley and a Senior Faculty Scientist in the Materials Sciences Division at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.


Dr. Steven Kaye, Co-founder and technical advisor

Steven Kaye is a co-founder and former CEO of Mosaic Materials. He is the former Chief Scientific Officer of Wildcat Discovery Technologies, developing energy storage materials using combinatorial chemistry. At Wildcat, he managed the Chemistry and Engineering groups, including more than 80 projects with materials suppliers, cell manufactures and OEMs. Dr. Kaye’s work led to more than 30 patents and development, scaling, and licensing of multiple battery materials for consumer electronics, automotive, and medical applications. He received a B.S. in Chemistry from MIT and Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley, working on gas storage and separations in metal-organic frameworks. He currently works at Apple, Inc. and serves as an advisor to Mosaic.


Dr. Mike Biddle, Director

Dr. Biddle started MBA Polymers over 20 years ago – literally from his garage.  He grew MBA to the world’s leading multi-national company recovering plastics from end-of-life durable goods, such as computers, electronics, appliances, automobiles and now household waste.  He and his team raised over $150 million in investment from angel, strategic, venture and private equity investors to eventually build out MBA processing capacity to over 300 million lbs/yr in Europe and China.  Some of the largest manufacturers in the world use MBA’s plastics to replace virgin plastics in their new products.